Program for Early-stage Grants Advancing Sustainability Science (PEGASuS)

Read the latest news from PEGASuS

The challenges facing the world today – from the loss of biodiversity on land and in the ocean and the need to supply a growing population with food, water and energy – are complex. To solve them, science and society will need to work together to develop solutions that meet the needs of communities around the world.

The Program for Early-stage Grants Advancing Sustainability Science (PEGASuS) seeks increase knowledge, promote innovation, and establish evidence-based solutions to the world’s most difficult sustainability challenges. PEGASuS brings together researchers from across borders and the natural and social sciences to take creative approaches to exploring the relationships between people and the planet. Our goal is to generate self-sustaining research projects that will have real impacts on the health and wellbeing of human societies.

Future Earth announced the first round of grants, focusing on biodiversity and natural assets, through PEGASuS in summer 2017. Five projects were selected for funding. They are:

  • “Drug Trafficking and Central American Protected Areas: Focusing on Participatory Governance to Conserve Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity,” Bernardo Aguilar González PI, Fundación Neotrópica
  • “Farmer-led Agroecological Research in Malawi (FARM) for Biodiversity,” Rachel Bezner Kerr PI, Cornell University
  • “Toward biodiversity-related opportunities for sustainable development: a global social-ecological mountain comparison,” Markus Fischer PI, GMBA and University of Bern
  • “Nurturing a Shift towards Equitable Valuation of Nature in the Anthropocene (EQUIVAL),” Unai Pascual PI, ecoSERVICES and Basque Centre for Climate Change
  • “Cross-pollinating knowledge systems: exploring indigenous local knowledge about native bee diversity and ecology,” Wendy R. Townsend PI, University of Florida

Future Earth will announce two additional funding opportunities through PEGASuS, focusing on the ocean and on issues of food, water and energy, in 2018 and 2019.

PEGASuS is funded in part by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation’s Science Program and the NOMIS Foundation. PEGASuS is jointly administered by Future Earth and Colorado State University's Global Biodiversity Center. It seeks to bring together researchers from different scientific disciplines to explore areas critical to the health of humans and the planet.